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The Golden Twenties

Revolutionary Era of German Art, Culture & Science

Happy Twenties, Roaring Twenties and probably best known as the Golden Twenties, is the decade of the 1920s in Germany. This period of cultural and economic success in the second half of the 1920s is closely related to modern city and mass culture. In Germany, the "Goldenen Zwanziger" (Golden Twenties) are primarily associated with developments in Berlin. The Golden Twenties were a wild and revolutionary era, in terms of lifestyle as well as fashion and technology. 

Diplomats Society is pleased to give you insights into this famous era of glamorous art and culture, free of censorship and full of development and rapid growth.

Economical Boom

The Golden Twenties in Germany are the period of cultural and economic boom between 1924 and 1929. Industrialization, urbanization of Berlin and economic stabilization. Cultural innovations, changes in everyday and work culture, innovations in music, art, literature, architecture and the new media of radio and film. The era includes features such as "culture of the big city", "girl culture" and the changed role of women, "American way of life", dance, sports, cinema, enthusiasm for technology, avant-garde and new ways of presenting art and literature .

Life pulsed in the big cities and especially in Berlin, the cultural center of Germany - a European cultural metropolis par excellence. The city magically attracted people from all over Europe. The basic human rights of the Weimar constitution and personal freedoms, enabled Berlin to rise as the cultural metropolis of the 1920s. Art and culture experienced a so far unknown boom.

Spotlight Berlin

Cultural Metropolis

In 1920, Berlin became the largest industrial city in Europe. Millions of inhabitants came and the city grew from 66 to 878 square kilometers. Berlin was the second largest city in the world in terms of area and the third largest city in the world in terms of population. Berlin had become a world city - the capital of the 19th century. Berlin was past, present and future.

Berlin's twenties were a time of optimism and new directions in almost every way. With the end of the strict imperial period, the customs loosened. Everything beautiful was allowed. Breaking taboos and excesses in fun-loving nightlife.

The united transport companies revolutionized local traffic on the streets and Potsdamer Platz became the busiest intersection in Europe. There was also a spirit of optimism in architecture. The builders wanted to give the growing population more light, air and sun instead of building more "gruesome rat holes" in the tenement city.

Berlin - a city that was bursting with ideas. The pictures from that time are pictures of a lost city. However, they have retained their huge appeal to this day. A lot of things seem far away, but still up to date. Issues such as housing shortages, party nights, and airport troubles persist to this day.

On Potsdamer Platz, the busiest square in Europe, it became increasingly confusing and dangerous. 26 tram lines and five bus lines crossed the square, plus horse-drawn vehicles and pedestrians.

 

In 1924, Germany's first traffic light was put into operation at Potsdamer Platz.

 

 

The largest and fastest airship in the world shouldn't have been built. Nevertheless, in September 1924, the Zeppelin made a lap over downtown Berlin, to the delight of the population.

 

A proof of strength and size hovered over the Brandenburg Gate - an achievement of German engineering.

 

We thank all participants, partners and members of the network for their cooperation, contribution and effort. The images provided in this story are featured and copyright protected by multiple notable members of the community: Visit Berlin, Berliner Zeitung, Bundesarchiv, Deutsches Technikmuseum, TASCHEN, BMWi, IAA, BMW, Opel, Daimler, Mercedes-Benz, Nürburgring, akg images, audible, CMG Worldwide, shutterstock and Diplomats Society.

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VERTICAL FARMING

growing future

Golden Twenties

Revolutionary Era of

German Art, Culture & Science

Happy Twenties, Roaring Twenties and probably best known as the Golden Twenties, is the decade of the 1920s in Germany. This period of cultural and economic success in the second half of the 1920s is closely related to modern city and mass culture. In Germany, the "Goldenen Zwanziger" (Golden Twenties) are primarily associated with developments in Berlin. The Golden Twenties were a wild and revolutionary era, in terms of lifestyle as well as fashion and technology. 

Diplomats Society is pleased to give you insights into this famous era of glamorous art and culture, free of censorship and full of development and rapid growth.

Economical Boom

The Golden Twenties in Germany are the period of cultural and economic boom between 1924 and 1929. Industrialization, urbanization of Berlin and economic stabilization. Cultural innovations, changes in everyday and work culture, innovations in music, art, literature, architecture and the new media of radio and film.

The era includes features such as "culture of the big city", "girl culture" and the changed role of women, "American way of life", dance, sports, cinema, enthusiasm for technology, avant-garde and new ways of presenting art and literature.

Life pulsed in the big cities and especially in Berlin, the cultural center of Germany - a European cultural metropolis par excellence. The city magically attracted people from all over Europe. The basic human rights of the Weimar constitution and personal freedoms, enabled Berlin to rise as the cultural metropolis of the 1920s. Art and culture experienced a so far unknown boom.

Spotlight Berlin

Cultural Metropolis

In 1920, Berlin became the largest industrial city in Europe. Millions of inhabitants came and the city grew from 66 to 878 square kilometers. Berlin was the second largest city in the world in terms of area and the third largest city in the world in terms of population. Berlin had become a world city - the capital of the 19th century. Berlin was past, present and future.

Berlin's twenties were a time of optimism and new directions in almost every way. With the end of the strict imperial period, the customs loosened. Everything beautiful was allowed. Breaking taboos and excesses in fun-loving nightlife.

The united transport companies revolutionized local traffic on the streets and Potsdamer Platz became the busiest intersection in Europe. There was also a spirit of optimism in architecture. The builders wanted to give the growing population more light, air and sun instead of building more "gruesome rat holes" in the tenement city.

Berlin - a city that was bursting with ideas. The pictures from that time are pictures of a lost city. However, they have retained their huge appeal to this day. A lot of things seem far away, but still up to date. Issues such as housing shortages, party nights, and airport troubles persist to this day.

On Potsdamer Platz, the busiest square in Europe, it became increasingly confusing and dangerous. 26 tram lines and five bus lines crossed the square, plus horse-drawn vehicles and pedestrians.

The largest and fastest airship in the world shouldn't have been built. Nevertheless, in September 1924, the Zeppelin made a lap over downtown Berlin, to the delight of the population.

In 1924, Germany's first traffic light was put into operation at Potsdamer Platz.

A proof of strength and size hovered over the Brandenburg Gate - an achievement of German engineering.

We thank all participants, partners and members of the network for their cooperation, contribution and effort. The images provided in this story are featured and copyright protected by multiple notable members of the community: Visit Berlin, Berliner Zeitung, Bundesarchiv, Deutsches Technikmuseum, TASCHEN, BMWi, IAA, BMW, Opel, Daimler, Mercedes-Benz, Nürburgring, akg images, audible, CMG Worldwide, shutterstock and Diplomats Society.

1 | 2 | 3

keep me updated

By clicking submit above, you consent to allow us to store and process the personal information submitted above to provide you the content requested.

IMPRINT  |  GTC  |  ©  DGDA Diplomatische Dienste GmbH.

All rights reserved. WE LOVE COOKIES.BY VISITING OUR SITE,

YOU AGREE TO OUR POLICY. Errors and omissions excepted.